105 – You plan your ministry. When do you plan your life? [Podcast]

A planned day of reflection in real time

 

Welcome to Season 3 of the Your Church Matters podcastIn this week’s episode, I’m sharing some thoughts on Life Planning and life rhythms for pastors and leaders by sharing real time thoughts that occurred on a planned quarterly day of reflection on my own life plan.

 

 

For more information on Life Planning resources, click here.

For more information on Personal and Spiritual Development resources, click here.

 

How you can help me help others:

Specifically, in response to this episode, send me your helpful resources for small church pastors so that I can share them.  You can comment below or email me at contactgerrylewis@gmail.com.

  • Subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and give us a rating and review. 
  • We are also on Stitcher.com and Google Play, so if you prefer one of those formats, please subscribe there.
  • Share the love by clicking on one or more of the social share buttons at either the top or bottom of this post.

To comment on this episode or leave a question for a future episode:

1. Comment section below

2. Email: contactgerrylewis@gmail.com

3. Voicemail: 817-929-0643

4. Direct tweet @drgerrylewis

*Special thanks to Keith Cooper (Guitar Music for intro)

*Special thanks to Nathan Woodward (Saxophone Music for outro)

Four steps to avoid becoming a slave to your technology.

These tools are supposed to serve us, not enslave us.

 

I love technology!  I love gadgets and tools and apps!  I love my iPhone and iPad and MacBook (yes, I drank the Apple kool aid a few years back)! I’m a junkie for learning and productivity and effectiveness. I’m a sucker for gadgets and apps that make it easier to complete tasks faster.

In fact, I can spend an entire day being completely unproductive while working with productivity tools.  Do you see the problem?  Can you relate?

Before there was such thing as an iPhone or iPad, I wrote in my book, Culture Wars, “You may have joined the Adrenaline Culture if you don’t own a watch or a telephone—they own you.”

Wow!  Maybe I should go back and read that book again!

It is so incredibly easy for us to become slaves to the very tools that are, theoretically, designed to assist us.  We are constantly available and interruptible, so much so that we can’t manage to finish a conversation with a flesh-and-blood person in front of us because of the intrusions of our devices.

 

It is easy to become slaves to the very tools that are, theoretically, designed to assist us. Click To Tweet

 

Not only that, we have created the expectation that we are instantly accessible – all day, every day.  Because of that, we have people in our lives who become incredibly frustrated with us if we don’t answer every phone call, instantly reply to every text message, and respond to email within 30 minutes.

Well, my friends, it is time to show our technology who’s boss! 

Wouldn’t it be great if it were that simple?  The truth is we didn’t get here overnight, and we won’t regain balance and margin overnight either.  But, if we don’t start with some positive steps in the right direction today, we won’t be where we need to be tomorrow, or next week, or next year.

 

So, here are some suggested baby steps:

  1. Deliberately take some time every day to be unavailable.  Start with 15 minutes a day that you are actually not in the same room with your technology.  Take a walk. Take a nap.  Do something unconnected and unplugged.  No excuses (I might miss an important message … I might need to take a picture … What if there is an emergency …).
  2. Set boundaries and expectations. Plan in advance how you will respond to and process phone calls, texts, and emails.  Voice mail is a wonderful tool.  My outgoing voicemail message actually tells people that I only check it a couple of times per day and asks them for specific information so I can be prepared when I return the call.  Because I have set that expectation, I can truly check messages on my schedule instead of someone else’s. 
  3. Schedule the technology interactions that you can.  Determine in advance the 2 or 3 times a day that you will check and respond to email.  Try this: 30 minutes mid-morning, 30 minutes mid-afternoon, 30 minutes at the end of the work day.  If you can’t manage a complete day’s worth of email in 90 minutes, your problem is bigger than technology.
  4. Wherever you are, be all there.  Don’t let technology rob you of real, human interaction.  Always choose your family over your technology.  Always choose conversation with your lunch companion over the call that comes in during lunch.

 

Always choose conversation with your lunch companion over the call that comes in during lunch. Click To Tweet

 

There is so much more I could say on this matter.  But for now, let me remind you that your life matters to God.  If your technology doesn’t support that as your assistant, you may need to fire it as your boss.

Please give me a rating (unless you don’t think I’m perfect)

The uselessness of fake feedback

 

You’ll be receiving a customer feedback survey on the service you received from me.  I will be in trouble with my manager if I don’t get all 10’s.

Yes, that is what she told me.  I won’t tell you which company because it doesn’t matter.  The not-so-subtle message is, “Tell everyone we’re great or keep your opinion to yourself.

“Fake news” is a big thing currently,  but it’s not new.  Neither is fake feedback. As far back as I can remember, people have asked for my opinion.  They really want it.  It really matters.  Unless I don’t agree with them or have a suggestion about how they might think about it from another perspective.  In that case, my opinion is not so valued.

 

Don’t try this at home, boys and girls:

She: Does this shirt make me look fat?

He: Does this shirt make me look stupid?

She: Wrong answer.

Me: The above scenario was entirely invented out of my warped imagination.

 

Now, in fairness, I understand the pressure of getting good ratings in our very public, social media-driven world.  Get enough 1 or 2-star Yelp reviews and you start to lose potential customers.  Get enough 1 or 2-star Amazon reviews and nobody but your friends and family will buy your book or other product (and they will only buy it if it’s on sale).

A friend told me that back in the day before online reviews, his company had a training about customer service.  They said that, on average, the person who has a positive experience will tell three people.  A person who has a negative experience will tell seventeen!

Now, make that as simple a clicking stars online and you’re messing with someone’s livelihood.  After all, who takes the time to go and read the reason for those low ratings? 

So, I get it.  The pressure is there.

Is there any lesson for us beyond, “If you can’t say something nice, don’t say anything at all?”

 

Here are some possible lessons:

  1. If you are going to give feedback, start directly with the person whose service, product, or interaction you are “rating.”  Talk to people!  Allow for questions and conversation.  Anyone who is truly interested in your feedback wants to know how they can get even better.
  2. Unless you have been hired by someone as a critic, it is not your job to protect the world from someone who offered you less than you expected.  I would go on with this explanation, but those who find the need to publicly point out every shortcoming have already dismissed me.
  3. If you are going to give a rating, make sure you are rating the right thing.  I actually got a 1-star review of one of my books on Amazon from a person who didn’t read it.  She gave a 1-star rating because she ordered the electronic version instead of the paperback and she doesn’t read eBooks!
  4. Give more praise than criticism.  Poor service/products and bad attitudes will eventually be weeded out by actual experience. Help people find the hidden treasures and the roses among the thorns, rather than the thorns on the rose bushes and the dirt under the treasure chest.

As those who understand that our lives matter to God, we understand there is a better way: “Instead, we will speak the truth in love, growing in every way more and more like Christ, who is the head of his body, the church.” (Ephesians 4:15)

Truth spoken in love trumps online clicks every time.

104 – Please, Pastor, just one sermon at a time! [Podcast]

Making the most of the incredible opportunity of preaching

 

Welcome to Season 3 of the Your Church Matters podcastIn this week’s episode, I’m sharing some thoughts for preachers on something every one of us has done at some point: preached one sermon that should have been more than one.

 

 

Occupational hazards of highly motivated preachers

  1. We want people to know everything we know about a subject, so we give them too much information in one setting.
  2. We want to share insight that they’ve never heard, so we either dig around in the obscure margins or we try to get too creative.
  3. We want them to be impressed and inspired with our content and our delivery, so we spend too much time crafting and not enough time clarifying.
  4. We want them to respond with changed minds and behavior, so we expect them to come to the same conclusions in half an hour that we have come to in years of study.
  5. We want to be sure that our ministries are Bible-driven, so we try to do too many things from the pulpit.
  6. We want people to believe right things and do right things, so we tell them what to believe and what to do.

 

In preaching, spend more time clarifying than you spend crafting. Click To Tweet

 

Plain truth to give us a roadmap to make the most of the opportunity

  1. The power of a sermon is severely overrated when it comes to discipleship, pastoral care, and evangelism.
  2. A very, very small number of preachers can preach effectively for 45 minutes or more. That number is probably one less than you think it is.
  3. If your sermon points have sub-points, you don’t have a sermon; you have a sermon series.
  4. One powerfully clear big idea is more memorable than 3 creatively alliterated points.
  5. One clear, practical application that can be implemented in the next 24 hours is better than 3 abstract Biblical principles.
  6. A personal story of how this works in your life is more meaningful than a well-researched illustration.
  7. A topical sermon can be just as Biblical and effective as an “expository”  verse-by-verse sermon. Look at the sermons recorded in the New Testament.
  8. The sermon is a crucial component of corporate worship, but it is not the central focus. Only Jesus is the center. If corporate worship is a banquet, he is the host, the guest of honor, and the feast all rolled into one.

 

1 practical application, implementable in the next 24 hrs, is better than 3 abstract principles. Click To Tweet

 

Resources Mentioned

 

Alan Hirsch

@alanhirsch

Order the book from Amazon

Order the book directly from 5Q Central (iBook, Kindle, Paperback)

Find out more about 5Q Resources

 

How you can help me help others:

Specifically, in response to this episode, send me your helpful resources for small church pastors so that I can share them.  You can comment below or email me at contactgerrylewis@gmail.com.

  • Subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and give us a rating and review. 
  • We are also on Stitcher.com and Google Play, so if you prefer one of those formats, please subscribe there.
  • Share the love by clicking on one or more of the social share buttons at either the top or bottom of this post.

To comment on this episode or leave a question for a future episode:

1. Comment section below

2. Email: contactgerrylewis@gmail.com

3. Voicemail: 817-929-0643

4. Direct tweet @drgerrylewis

*Special thanks to Keith Cooper (Guitar Music for intro)

*Special thanks to Nathan Woodward (Saxophone Music for outro)

Eat this book!

A review and recommendation of "5Q"

Photo credit: 5qcentral.com

 

Why do we read books?  I mean, seriously, have you ever thought about that?  Sometimes the answer for me is, “Because I can.”  It is one of the great joys of life.  I can get caught up in a great story.  I can learn something new.  I can be mad, glad, and sad — sometimes all within the same book. I can go places I’ve never been and perhaps never will go.  I can identify places I must go.

I hope you get the point.  Reading for me is like eating.  And as someone who has recently had to focus on a heart-healthy diet, I’m often asked about my diet restrictions.  I tell people, “I can eat anything I want.  I just have to want to eat better things.”  

A couple of days ago I completed a feast of a book. It contained some of my favorite tastes, but also some flavors that were unfamiliar. There were bites that were tender, melt-in-your-mouth goodness, but also some chewy pieces that required some effort. 

If you were to ask me whether it falls into the “tastes good” or “good for you” category, I’d have to say, “Yes!

Alan Hirsch’s book, “5Q: Reactivating the Original Intelligence and Capacity of the Body of Christ,” is tender and chewy, nutritious and delicious, strange and familiar—and it has made me hungry for more.

This year marks 40 years in church ministry for me, but I’ve been a little late to the party when it comes to concepts of “the fivefold, APEST, and 5Q” (used interchangeably within the book). My tradition, education, and experience — while not falling completely into the charismatic or cessationist camps — have not made much room for those concepts.

The Ephesians 4 listing of Apostles, Prophets, Evangelists, Shepherds (Pastors), and Teachers was typically presented alongside the other “spiritual gift” passages (primarily Romans 12 and 1 Corinthians 12) as indications of how God has equipped certain members of the Body of Christ with certain ministry capacities.  The main difference in the Ephesians passage was usually presented as specific roles entrusted to leaders for the sake of equipping and empowering all the members for ministry.

The idea that these capacities are actually ALL essential for a healthy Body, made about as much sense as suggesting that any other individual spiritual gift was necessary. “Your church isn’t a healthy church if you don’t have someone with the gift of giving.  Ok, maybe that’s true, but we have who we have, right?  We can’t make people gifted in ways they are not.  You see the dilemma?

But I’ve heard enough about APEST and missional — and the name of Alan Hirsch — in recent years that I was intrigued when I heard about the book.  So I came to it, as he says in the introduction, “with soft eyes” and an open heart. 

Can I just say that it makes sense? He spent enough time laying the theological and Biblical framework that I was prepared for some practical teaching and explanation. I was not disappointed.  The unfamiliar tastes began to meld together in such a way that they simply tasted right and I wanted more.

I refuse to blame any of my teachers or mentors for the gap in my understanding.  I take full responsibility and recognize that I may have just missed it.  But I’m not finished learning and I came away from this book with: (1) a fuller — and I believe more Biblical — understanding of God’s intent for the Body of Christ, (2) a reference guide to continue growing in my understanding and practice, and (3) access to an online toolkit to help me turn knowledge into ministry.

I can’t recommend “5Q” highly enough for anyone who is truly interested in seeing the Body of Christ visibly manifest in the world in all its fullness.

 

For More Information

Order the book from Amazon

Order the book directly from 5Q Central (iBook, Kindle, Paperback)

Find out more about 5Q Resources

 

103 – Living with a sense of sacred “sent-ness.” [podcast]

We have already been sent

 

Welcome to Season 3 of the Your Church Matters podcastIn this week’s episode, I’m sharing some thoughts on a topic I have been struggling with for a few weeks.  It was actually intended to be last week’s episode, but I just couldn’t get the handle on it that I wanted.

I need to thank Brad Brisco from Missional Church Network for starting my thinking down this path about a year ago.

 

 

Here am I, send me.

My tribe of the evangelical family has probably sent more missionaries than any other part of evangelicalism since our founding in 1845.  We currently have thousands of missionaries around the world.  We’re big on sending.  We even have a really large event called the Send Conference.

We seek to consistently focus on what is known as the Great CommissionJesus came and told his disciples, “I have been given all authority in heaven and on earth. Therefore, go and make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit. Teach these new disciples to obey all the commands I have given you. And be sure of this: I am with you always, even to the end of the age.” (Matthew 28:18-20)

We seek also to consistently pray for God to send more workers into the harvest: When he saw the crowds, he had compassion on them, because they were harassed and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd. Then he said to his disciples, “The harvest is plentiful but the workers are few. Ask the Lord of the harvest, therefore, to send out workers into his harvest field.” (Matthew 9:36-38)

God’s calling of Isaiah in the Old Testament has been a central text in our missionary thinking: Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, “Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?”And I said, “Here am I. Send me!” (Isaiah 6:8)

I began a few years ago, praying every day at 9:38 a.m. (based on Matthew 9:38), “Lord of the harvest, send workers into the harvest.”  Recognizing that one of the great needs for harvest workers is pastors for pastorless churches, I added, “Send pastors into our churches.”  And then recognizing that so many churches have an almost exclusively inward focus, I added, “Send churches into their communities.” Finally, recognizing praying for God to send others leaves out a big part of being a Christ-follower, I added, “Send me where you want me to go.”

Then I had my first aha moment.  It is His world, His harvest, His workers.  So, I adjusted my prayer: “Lord of the harvest, send workers into YOUR harvest. Send pastors intoYOUR churches. Send churches intoYOUR communities. Send me where you want me to go inYOUR world.” 

That prayer has continued until recent months, when I experienced my second aha moment.  We’ve been hoping and praying that God would send someone (us or someone else) into His harvest.  We’ve been so focused on who He might send where, that we have missed this incredibly simple, but profoundly life-changing reality: we have already been sent.

 

I’m sending you

Here’s a profound quote from Alan Hirsch’s new book “5 Q“: “Toward the end of his [Jesus] ministry in Israel, he confers his own sentness upon the ecclesia; the movement is thus birthed through his apostolic ministry. The so-called Johannine Commission (“As the Father has sent me, I am sending you” John 20:21) is one of the definitively apostolic texts in the New Testament.”

Here’s the aha moment we need to experience within our churches: Everyone who has been called into the community of the redeemed (the family of God, the Body of Christ, the church) has been called and gifted for ministry and has already been sent into the world.

Therefore, the final part of my prayer has now changed from “send me where you want me to go in your world” to “help me today to live sent.”

What would it look like if we didn’t just pray for God to send people to different places in His harvest, but we would pray that all of us would live with a sense of sacred sent-ness?

 

What sent-ness looks like

Here’s another quote from Alan Hirsch: “The church then is not only God’s redeemed people, but they are the human agency by which Jesus extends his own ministry into the world.  The church carries out the work that Jesus started and it does it in a way that is consistent with who Jesus was and how he went about his own ministry.”

He also shares a quote attributed to Augustine that gets to the heart of what sent-ness looks like: “A Christian is: a mind through which Christ thinks, a heart through which Christ loves, a voice through which Christ speaks, and a hand through which Christ helps.”

Now think about that in terms of where we have already been sent:

  • To our families
  • To our neighborhoods
  • To our workplaces
  • To our churches
  • To our communities
  • To our schools

If we saw ourselves as already sent to those places, would it affect our behavior?  Would it affect our words?  Would it affect our attitudes?

If we, in our churches, began to focus on the reality that we have already been sent, would it affect our ministries?  Is it possible that some ministries that only happen inside the church building would be scuttled in favor of ministries out among the people?

Brad Brisco shocked me last year with this thought: If all our ministries are directed toward getting people into the church – inviting them to move toward us – we are actually expecting them to live like missionaries. We can never forget that Jesus has sent us to them.

I have watched churches shrivel and move toward death with good intentions to be open, friendly, and willing to minister to anyone God sends to them.

Why would we expect God to send anyone to us if we are unwilling to fulfill our own sent-ness?

 

Resources Mentioned

Missional Church Network  

Brad Brisco – @bradbrisco_kc

Alan Hirsch

@alanhirsch

 

 

How you can help me help others:

Specifically, in response to this episode, send me your helpful resources for small church pastors so that I can share them.  You can comment below or email me at contactgerrylewis@gmail.com.

  • Subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and give us a rating and review. 
  • We are also on Stitcher.com and Google Play, so if you prefer one of those formats, please subscribe there.
  • Share the love by clicking on one or more of the social share buttons at either the top or bottom of this post.

To comment on this episode or leave a question for a future episode:

1. Comment section below

2. Email: contactgerrylewis@gmail.com

3. Voicemail: 817-929-0643

4. Direct tweet @drgerrylewis

*Special thanks to Keith Cooper (Guitar Music for intro)

*Special thanks to Nathan Woodward (Saxophone Music for outro)

 

Stop putting God first in your life!

In search of God-centeredness

 

What are your priorities in life? Let’s not even talk yet about the order of your priorities.  Let’s just identify the priorities themselves.

Let’s see … there’s work (gotta pay the bills, right?), family (they are the reason we have bills),  hobbies (“me” time), friends (we don’t want to get isolated), church (don’t want to get in trouble with God), education (we don’t want our kids being “ignernt), work (yes, we’ve already listed that one, but the bills were a little more than we anticipated), and God (church is not the only place we think about Him … hopefully).

Maybe we better throw in some community service (if it helps us look good and make some “connections,” makes us feel better about ourselves, makes our communities safer for our kids, or supports the causes that are important to us).

I hope that doesn’t sound cynical.  That’s not my intent.  I do think, however, that we tend to identify priorities based on a self-centered approach to life.  By self-centered, I don’t mean selfish or self-absorbed.  A person can be self-centered and generous towards others at the same time.

I think of self-centered this way: every decision is determined by my preferences, my values, my passions, my beliefs, my needs, my desires, my goals, my vision, my energy, my time, my priorities, my calling, my ministry …

So, if I am a person of faith and I start to order my priorities according to the way I have likely been taught in church, it looks a lot like this: God first, then family, then work, then self.  So, how does that work?

Well, God first means that I pray and read my Bible every day and go to church as much as possible. Perhaps community service falls under the “God first” category and I’ll support an organization that is consistent with my faith perspective.

Family second means that I will give as much time and attention to them as possible. I’ll put education under this and try to provide for their current and future needs.  I’ll also make sure that they are in church so that their faith journey is nurtured.

In my work life, I’ll work hard and long and give the very best to my employer so that I can advance, earn a good living for my family, support my church, and set aside something for retirement.

And then whatever is left, I can think about hobbies and personal needs, since self is last.

Sounds good, right?  Except God doesn’t want to be in first place in your life. 

What?  Heresy!  Blasphemy!

I’m not suggesting that anything other than God belongs in first place.  I’m suggesting that putting God in any place in your list is still self-centered.  Our lives matter too much to God for us to live by a list. I’m suggesting that our lives need less prioritizing and more centering.  And what belongs at the center is not a what, but a Who.

 

Our lives need less prioritizing and more centering. #godcenteredliving Click To Tweet

 

God wants to be the center of your life.  God wants to be your life and live His life through you.

“And when Christ, who is your life, is revealed to the whole world, you will share in all his glory.” (Colossians 3:4) [emphasis mine]

“My old self has been crucified with Christ. It is no longer I who live, but Christ lives in me. So I live in this earthly body by trusting in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me.” (Galatians 2:20) [emphasis mine]

So, what does a God-centered life look like?  I’ll talk about that next week.

102 – Small church pastor, this is just for you. [Podcast]

Online resources for the small church pastor

 

Welcome to Season 3 of the Your Church Matters podcastIn this week’s episode, I’m sharing some online resources I have discovered over the past couple of years that are particularly focused on pastors and leaders of small churches.

 

 

Resources Mentioned

New Small Church

@karlvaters

200 Churches

Small Church Pastor (Dave Jacobs)

Dave Jacobs Quick Coaching Videos (Youtube channel)

 

Buy Kindle

Buy Paperback

 

How you can help me help others:

Specifically, in response to this episode, send me your helpful resources for small church pastors so that I can share them.  You can comment below or email me at contactgerrylewis@gmail.com.

  • Subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and give us a rating and review. 
  • We are also on Stitcher.com and Google Play, so if you prefer one of those formats, please subscribe there.
  • Share the love by clicking on one or more of the social share buttons at either the top or bottom of this post.

To comment on this episode or leave a question for a future episode:

1. Comment section below

2. Email: contactgerrylewis@gmail.com

3. Voicemail: 817-929-0643

4. Direct tweet @drgerrylewis

*Special thanks to Keith Cooper (Guitar Music for intro)

*Special thanks to Nathan Woodward (Saxophone Music for outro)

When is it time to quit?

Debunking the myth of "Winners never quit!"

“Quitters never win and winners never quit!”  (Vince Lombardi)

“… never give in, never give in, never, never, never, never-in nothing, great or small, large or petty—never give in … “ (Winston Churchill)

“Never give up! Never surrender!” (Galaxy Quest)

I could speculate that more people are familiar with Tim Allen’s character in Galaxy Quest than with Lombardi or Churchill, but that is a whole different speech.

The point is that endurance, effort, determination, stick-to-it-ive-ness — TRY HARDER — is the secret to greatness and significance.

Try harder!  Give 110%!

May I offer another quote?  Thanks for your permission.

“When the horse is dead, dismount.” (Various)

You see, my friends, the real secret to greatness is not determined effort; it is wise and focused effort.  It is not giving 110% to every task; it is giving precisely the right effort to the right task at the right time.  It is not simply doing things right; it is doing the right things.

And sometimes the very best thing to do is quit. 

Quitting something doesn’t mean you are a “quitter.”  Putting “er” on the end of a verb and changing it to a noun indicates that the nature of the noun is to habitually do the verb. You can take the time to re-read that sentence if you need to.  The point is that if you are a quitter it means that you habitually quit.  That’s the part of the Lombardi quote that is absolutely true.  If all you ever do is quit, you won’t ever win.

Quitting something doesn't make you a quitter. It may be a display of wisdom. Click To Tweet

The little-known part of the Churchill quote continues, “never give in except to convictions of honour and good sense.”  Sometimes continuing forward is dishonorable and foolish. (Click here for an audio recording of the entire speech)

Four suggestions to know when to quit

So how do you know when to quit? I certainly couldn’t give every scenario, but here are four suggestions (along with some hard questions):

  1. Quit when the only reason you can think of for doing this is that you have always done it this way and you don’t know another way. (So, you’ve decided to quit learning?)
  2. Quit when it is taking more and more effort and resources to achieve diminishing results. (So, you’ve decided that working harder is more valuable than working smarter?)
  3. Quit when you are more worried about what people will think if you change it than you are about what God will think if you don’t. (So, you’ve decided to be insecurely driven by the whims of self-centered people rather than confidently trusting in the faithfulness of the Eternal Father?)
  4. Quit when you know it is not working, but you are concerned that you will have wasted the resources you have already invested in it. (So you’ve decided to waste some more?)

Maybe the most important thing to quit is worrying. Don’t worry about anything; instead, pray about everything. Tell God what you need, and thank him for all he has done. Then you will experience God’s peace, which exceeds anything we can understand. His peace will guard your hearts and minds as you live in Christ Jesus. (Philippians 4:6-7)

Your life matters to God.  He knows how where your effort would be best spent.  He knows what you should quit.  Spend some time listening to Him.

101 – Yes, a Sabbatical is possible for the small church pastor! [Podcast]

Interview with Pastor Bobby Cates

Welcome to Season 3 of the Your Church Matters podcastIn this week’s episode I’m sharing an interview I did recently with my friend pastor Bobby Cates of Slidell’s First Baptist Church in Slidell, TX.

A few months ago, Bobby got to experience something that a lot of small church pastors never get close to and I wanted to spend some time with him to talk about it for the benefit of other small church pastors.

 

 

 

 

Key insights from this interview

“Biblical rest is intentional.”

“This is not my church. It is the Bride of Christ.”

“The best thing we can give our family is ourselves.”

 

Contacting Bobby Cates

Repenting Rebel Website

Repenting Rebel Podcast & Radio

Repenting Rebel Facebook

Repenting Rebel Twitter

Repenting Rebel Instagram

 

Slidell’s First Baptist Church Website

Slidell’s First Baptist Church Facebook

Slidell’s First Baptist Twitter

Slidell’s First Baptist Instagram

Resources Mentioned

Blinkist

Wordswag

Society for Church Consulting

 

Podcast episode with Farsi Pastor

 

How you can help me help others:

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To comment on this episode or leave a question for a future episode:

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*Special thanks to Keith Cooper (Guitar Music for intro)

*Special thanks to Nathan Woodward (Saxophone Music for outro)