Do you have money problems?

Depends on whether you use it or serve it.

Money, jobs, the economy, economic impact, the working class, the one percent, the national debt – Have any of these been discussed recently?

No, I haven’t missed the discussions; that was a poor attempt at sarcasm.  As a matter of fact, it seems that money often drives all other decisions.  Even the current discussion over a proposed bathroom bill in the Texas Legislature (whoever thought we’d be having this discussion) is often couched in economic impact terms.  How much money will our state lose over businesses and events that will not come to Texas if we demand that people use the restroom that coincides with the gender on their birth certificate?

No, I am not wading into the political waters on this.  That was just an example of how money can be the driver in almost every discussion.

I’ve been pondering the whole money problem since I recently re-read these words of Jesus in Luke 16:13 – “You cannot serve both God and money.”

In considering this statement from Jesus, I’ve come to some conclusions about the relationship between God and money.  These are not in any particular order, except the order in which I thought of them during one of my early morning pondering sessions.

  1. You can serve God without money.  People all over the world, in the deepest poverty, still manage to center their lives around the living out of their faith.
  2. You can serve money without God. People all over the world, no matter their economic status, are driven by the consuming passion to acquire more.
  3. You can use money to serve God.  People all over the world, no matter their economic status, have figured out ways to use the financial resources they have in a way that serves the focus of their faith. Some of them have continued to prosper and their prosperity has resulted in increased generosity and impact for the Kingdom of God.
  4. You cannot use God to serve money. There are certainly charlatans and hucksters who have claimed faith and ministry as a means to line their own pockets.  It may work for awhile.  How long it works is always longer that we think it should be. But a time of reckoning will come.
  5. God is the proper focus and motivation for worship and service. God is not particularly interested in being anyone’s #1 priority.  God’s place is not the first of many, but the Center of all.
  6. Money is a tool to be used in worship and service. It is a neutral object. When an object becomes the focus and motivation, it becomes service to a false god.  One word for that is “idolatry.”
  7. God is to be worshiped and served because we love Him and have come to understand His love for us.
  8. Money is to be used. It is not to be collected and hoarded but used for good and Godly purposes.
  9. God is always good. Always.
  10. Money is good when it is used for its intended purpose.  I was once on the Board of Directors of an independent ministry organization whose stated financial purpose was to rejoice as much in money that they spent in ministry to others as they did in contributions made to their ministry.

I’m not suggesting that a commitment to God will solve all your “money problems.” I am suggesting that a recognition that your life matters to Him can keep you from being enslaved by it.

097 – How do you know when to help people? [Podcast]

Listener question

Welcome to Season 3 of the Your Church Matters podcast. In this episode (97) I’m continuing a multi-episode series answering questions from a survey I did a few months back with my subscriber list.

 

Question: “There are so many people out to scam others so how do you know when to help people. I have heard different takes on this but no one wants to be taken so how do you handle this?”

 

 

Issues at hand

Since there are some particulars about the questions with which I am unfamiliar, I’ve identified some general issues:

  • Requests for help come both to churches and to individuals.  Since this podcast is more church focused, I will lean that way in my discussion.  However, some principles work either way.
  • Requests for help come both from individuals and organizations/causes.  Some principles work either way, but there will certainly need to be individualized responses.

I have good news and bad news.

First, the bad news

  • There are indeed people who are out to scam.
  • They will target Christians because they know:
    • We care deeply.
    • We look for the best in people and causes.
    • We tend not to really do our homework
    • We are generally unfocused.
    • We are easily manipulated by sad stories.
    • We are supposed to be gracious and forgiving.
  • At some point, someone will take advantage of us.

Grandpa said (when someone took advantage of him), “If he can live with it, I can live without it.”

The good news

  • Those with legitimate needs and good causes far outnumber the scammers.
  • It is much easier to find information than ever before.
  • The fact that you are able to ask the question is an indication that God has blessed you with resources to help.
  • God does not expect you to say “yes” to every request, but to display His character in every response.

With those in mind, I want to finish with some strategic focus.  Strategy does not kill freedom; it creates it.  If you have clarity on where you are and where you are headed, you are able to make better decisions because you are not having to create strategy “on the fly” in every circumstance.

Be strategic

  • Clearly identify your missional priorities and strategies.
  • Strengthen partnerships to multiply effective ministry.
  • Prayerfully choose a primary focus ministry and review annually.
  • Establish a budget (time, talent, money).
  • Say “no” with grace because you are clear on your larger “yes.”
  • Leave room for “God moments.”

 

How you can help me help others:

  • Subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and give us a rating and review. 
  • We are also on Stitcher.com and Google Play, so if you prefer one of those formats, please subscribe there.
  • Share the love by clicking on one or more of the social share buttons at either the top or bottom of this post.

To comment on this episode or leave a question for a future episode:

1. Comment section below

2. Email: contactgerrylewis@gmail.com

3. Voicemail: 817-929-0643

4. Direct tweet @drgerrylewis

*Special thanks to Keith Cooper (Guitar Music)

*Special thanks to Nathan Woodward (Saxophone Music)

 

 

096 – How do we help people choose to come to church on Sunday? [Podcast]

A listener question

 

Welcome to Season 3 of the Your Church Matters podcast. Starting with this episode (96) I’m going to spend several episodes answering questions from a survey I did a few months back with my subscriber list.

 

Question: “Church vs. the recliner, how do we get people to feel comfortable coming to our time of Praise, Worship & Bible Teaching?”

 

 

Non-judgmental Analysis

First, I want to offer an analysis of the question.  I can’t be unbiased (no one can), but I intend to be non-judgmental.  I’m simply responding to what I see in the question.

Church vs. the Recliner – Is the “recliner” your main competition?  If you were to survey the non-church-attenders within a two-mile radius of your church, what percentage would say that they are spending that time sitting in the recliner instead of going to church?  I know that the question was posed by a male over the age of 60 who is retired from a non-church business (based on survey responses), so the “recliner” may be more of an issue within that demographic.  However, I suspect that it would still be a small percentage.

How do we get people to feel comfortable coming – Is your church really uncomfortable? If that is the case, what makes it so?  If the “recliner” is truly the main competition, then “comfort” may really be a big issue.  I wonder how many of those non-church-attenders would say, “I just don’t feel comfortable there,” because they know from having been there.  I also wonder how many would say, “I wouldn’t feel comfortable there,” out of speculation based on their perception or what they have heard?  Again, I suspect that “comfort” is not the primary issue.

Our time of Praise, Worship, and Bible Teaching – This may provide us with a good transition point.  “Our time” suggests to me that we are trying to get them to join us in what we are doing.  We may be getting somewhere with this one.  The tension between what we are doing on Sunday morning and what they are doing on Sunday morning is real.  How to most effectively deal with it is key.

Possible Diagnostic Questions

  1. What are people in our area doing on Sunday morning instead of going to church somewhere? Let’s not just think about our church, but let’s broaden it to any church. Are most of them really sitting home in the recliner?  Are they doing yard work?  Are they participating in youth sports leagues?  Are they on the lake or the golf course?  What options are there in our community?  Knowing those things will help us figure out how best to connect.  Assuming that the “recliner” is the only other attraction will limit our thinking and perhaps create ineffective outreach methods.
  2. Is our church really uncomfortable? If it were physically uncomfortable (seating, temperature, schedule) or had a spiritually/emotionally uncomfortable atmosphere, the regular attenders would be mentioning it. If that is the case, then start thinking about what adjustments or modifications can be made.
  3. Is our church comfortable to insiders but we are not communicating it well to guests or potential guests?  Could it be that our atmosphere and facilities are comfortable, but not guest-friendly?  I’ll refer you to two previous podcasts on the subject of guest-friendliness: Episode 41 – Make your church more guest-friendly in 7 days and Episode 42 – So, you think you’re guest-friendly.
  4. If our church closed, how long would it take for the non-church-attenders in our community to notice? I mentioned earlier that I suspect “comfort” is not the main issue. Is it possible that they don’t think church really matters?  Is it possible they don’t think attending church would have any impact on their lives?  Is it possible they don’t think we have a clue about what is going on in the real world and are not really doing anything to make an impact on the world?  It is not our job to make the gospel or Jesus relevant.  It is our job to demonstrate real world relevance.  Personal Bias Alert: It is my contention that trying to make people comfortable with the concept of “Bible teaching” is not far from trying to get them comfortable with the concept of a colonoscopy.  If I don’t believe the Bible really has anything to say to my circumstances, why would I want to come and listen to someone teach it? I believe we have done a disservice to the Bible by studying it for knowledge gaining rather than for life transformation.  That’s why I wrote my latest book, Why “Bible Study” Doesn’t Work: The epic failure of evangelicalism’s favorite discipleship method – and how Your Church can do something about it.
  5. Does our church communicate that we are interested in the lives of the people who live around us?  Here is an inconvenient truth: We have been sent to them; they have not been sent to us.  We are the ones with the missionary commission from God.  By asking them to join us in what we are doing, we are asking them to be the missionaries.  Rather, we are called to bring the presence of Jesus and the influence of the gospel into their world.  One of the greatest hindrances to people coming to church is our failure to BE the church.

 

One of the greatest hindrances to people coming to church is our failure to BE the church. Click To Tweet

 

How you can help me help others:

  • Subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and give us a rating and review. 
  • We are also on Stitcher.com and Google Play, so if you prefer one of those formats, please subscribe there.
  • Share the love by clicking on one or more of the social share buttons at either the top or bottom of this post.

To comment on this episode or leave a question for a future episode:

1. Comment section below

2. Email: contactgerrylewis@gmail.com

3. Voicemail: 817-929-0643

4. Direct tweet @drgerrylewis

*Special thanks to Keith Cooper (Guitar Music)

*Special thanks to Nathan Woodward (Saxophone Music)

#Tombstone Tweet

What will they say about you?

I once heard someone say that we wouldn’t worry so much about what people think of us if we realized how little they actually think about us.

So, why do we do the things we do?

I was recently challenged to think of legacy in a couple of ways.  The first was this question: “Who will be at your funeral and will not be looking at their watch?  Now, that’s a visual!  To ask it a different way – “Whose life are you really impacting?

A man died who was reported to have amassed a small fortune over the course of his life.  People around town began to speculate on the value of his estate.  One person finally worked up the courage to ask, “So how much did he leave?”

A thoughtful sage answered, “All of it.”

The value of our legacy is not measured in the size of our estate or even to whom we bequeath it; it is measured by our impact on other lives.

The second way I was challenged to think of legacy was to compose my tombstone tweet.  That’s a Twitter reference, in case you’re wondering what the heck a little bird has to do with a tombstone.  The idea is to describe what I want other people to say about me when I’m gone AND only use 140 characters (including spaces and punctuation).

After pondering my life’s mission and storylines, I came up with this: “He helped me envision what Jesus could be in me and then he championed my vision.

It’s not my desire or calling to tell people what they should be or do.  It is my desire to awaken a vision in each person of what life could be like if they allowed Jesus to fully live through them—in their unique and God-given personality, passion, and giftedness—and then champion that vision.

I dream of communities filled with people who are experiencing the full realization that their lives matter to God and living out their uniquely designed calling on an amazing life’s journey.  I imagine people passing on that legacy to each subsequent generation.  I imagine people who will never think about me or know my name being impacted by choices I am making today.

What about you?  What’s your tombstone tweet?  What will you leave behind that can’t be lost, corrupted, stolen, or destroyed?

Jesus said, Don’t store up treasures here on earth, where moths eat them and rust destroys them, and where thieves break in and steal. Store your treasures in heaven, where moths and rust cannot destroy, and thieves do not break in and steal.” (Matthew 6:19-20)

I have 59 characters left before I use up my 140 character limit.  I’m considering that representative of the indeterminate amount of time I have left to make my calling a reality. At 55, I’ve almost certainly lived more years than I have remaining.

What are you doing with the time you have left?

What do you call the day after the Super Bowl?

I call it Another Amazing Monday!

Another Super Bowl has come and gone.  The last time my team played in it:

  1. They were quarterbacked by Troy Aikman. He retired in 2001 and was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2006.
  2. I watched the game in a dark fellowship hall at Eagle Mountain Baptist Church, where I had been pastor for almost 4 years.  I was pastor there for 17 years and have been gone for almost 9.
  3. My 4-year-old son acted out the entire game in the corner of the fellowship hall and provided almost as much entertainment as the game itself.  He’s now 26 years old, still acting, and sent me a text at the end of last night’s game that said, “What just happened?!”
  4. Tom Brady was a backup quarterback at the University of Michigan.  As of last night, he has won more Super Bowls than any quarterback in history (5) and has been named Super Bowl MVP more than any player in history (4). He’s also the oldest starting quarterback in the NFL.

Last night, I adopted the Falcons as my team to cheer for because I really, really am NOT a fan of the Patriots, Tom Brady, or Bill Belichick.  So much for my cheering power!

The Super Bowl commercials get a solid D in my grade book. Nothing stood out.  Nothing was really funny or moving or memorable.  A few were just plain uncomfortable.

The halftime show was a solid and entertaining performance by an artist in whom I have no interest.  My Facebook feed was filled with people who reported that they were skipping the halftime show because of who was performing, and then with people who were pleasantly surprised that she was not more political, and then with people who were unpleasantly surprised that people were not more critical of who she is than of her performance.  Seriously?

So, what’s today? Another Amazing Monday!  That’s what I call the day after the Super Bowl.

No matter where you live, what happens with your teams, how much you have in the bank, or the condition of your health–life is still Amazing!

What a shame it is when we miss OUR Amazing because we get wrapped up in “stuff.”

We are Amazing when we are Amazed by God and join Him in His Amazing activity in the world.  I’ve been saying that regularly for a couple of years and I’m sticking to it.

We are Amazing when we are Amazed by God and join Him in His Amazing activity in the world. Click To Tweet

But don’t miss this: The pursuit of Amazing is not conducted from the sidelines, the grandstand, the recliner, or the pew. Passive observers don’t find it.

Only active participants can join the journey toward Amazing. Your life—the one you are LIVING, not simply OBSERVING—matters to God.

Jesus said, “The thief approaches with malicious intent, looking to steal, slaughter, and destroy; I came to give life with joy and abundance.” (John 10:10, The Voice)

Abundant … Full … Amazing. What will you do to “get in the game” today?

095 – Give me 10 good reasons not to give up on Facebook [Podcast]

10 tips for Facebook engagement for individuals and churches

Welcome to Season 3 of the Your Church Matters podcast. In this episode (95) was inspired by the Facebook post of a friend (not just a FB friend, but a real one for over 30 years).  I responded on Facebook and then decided to do a podcast for the benefit of other Christ-followers and churches who may be dealing with the same question.

The Seed

My friend’s post: Looking for 10 reasons to not leave facebook….ready…go

My response: Because we who have higher aspirations for Facebook and other social media should not abandon it to the trolls, whiners, critics, and generally miserable people who use it for no other reason than to spread their misery. Facebook is unparalleled in its connection potential for either good or evil. I choose to be intentional in how I use it for good, knowing that I will have to ignore a lot, block some, and endure some for the sake of making use of its kingdom potential. I hope you will as well.

The Growing Thoughts

Rather than simply giving reasons not to give up on Facebook, I thought it more helpful to give tips on how those of us who are not giving up can use it for effective engagement.

 

10 Tips for Facebook Engagement

1. See it as a tool.

2. See it as 1 tool in your toolbox.

3. Use it strategically to serve a larger mission.

4. Never forget that you are the guest in a public space.

5. Never forget that you represent your God, your church, your community.

6. Social media is about influence. We do not expand influence through burning bridges.

7. “Yes, and” is conversation.  “Yes, but” is argument. Nothing moves forward without common ground.

8. Please don’t equate yourself with Jesus or the prophets as an excuse for being offensive.

9. Don’t get sucked into other people’s drama.

10. Take regular breaks, unplug, get outside and breathe, be completely present with real people. (Turn off push notifications).

 

I mentioned this quote in this episode: Once you become a political operative for one party, you are a tool to one party, and enemy to the other, and prophetic to neither. The quote was from a guest on a recent episode of the 200 Churches Podcast.

How you can help me help others:

  • Subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and give us a rating and review. 
  • We are also on Stitcher.com and Google Play, so if you prefer one of those formats, please subscribe there.
  • Share the love by clicking on one or more of the social share buttons at either the top or bottom of this post.

To comment on this episode or leave a question for a future episode:

1. Comment section below

2. Email: contactgerrylewis@gmail.com

3. Voicemail: 817-929-0643

4. Direct tweet @drgerrylewis

*Special thanks to Keith Cooper (Guitar Music)

*Special thanks to Nathan Woodward (Saxophone Music)

The Love Trap: Captivated or Held Captive?

How do you want to be loved?

How do you want to be loved?

Perhaps you favor a classic romance story.  Perhaps you are more inclined toward the hero story, where one self-sacrifices the opportunity for personal romantic love for the sake of the benefit of many in need.  Perhaps you are one who recognizes that the selfless love of a mother for her child is the nearest thing to perfect love.

The truth is, we all want to be loved passionately, heroically, and selflessly.  Yes, even the manliest man wants to be the beneficiary of love like that. It just looks a little different in our imaginations.

The truth is, we all want to be loved passionately, heroically, and selflessly. Click To Tweet

But there is an inherent trap in our search for that kind of love.  Seen properly, we can be captivated by love.  But a distorted view results in being held captive.

What’s the difference? To be captivated is to have one’s attention and interest held by something so excellent and amazing that we willingly and freely embrace a new reality.  To be held captive is to be a prisoner, enslaved and dominated by the choices of another.

If you are captivated by love, neither your sense of worth nor your ability to love others will change based upon their responses.  If you are held captive, you are dependent upon being treated a certain way.  Otherwise, you will feel wounded, threatened, or fearful of losing the love to which you so desperately cling.

There is truly only one love that is so captivating.  Best selling author Ted Dekker describes it this way in his new book, The Forgotten Way:

To be sure, loving as Yeshua [Jesus] loved is not something you will perfect in this life, but the awareness of that true love will radically change your experience in this life.

Imagine being accepted and truly loved exactly as you are at all times by your partner or friends, no matter what you do or don’t do. Now imagine your acceptance of them in the same way and focus on this latter state of being.

In such an ideal manifestation of love through the power of the Holy Spirit, no matter what they did, you would look at them without blame, feeling whole. What joy would then live in your heart, you who are unprovoked and keep no record of wrong. What love you would then offer your partner, yourself and the world. How invulnerable you would be, in the world but not of it.

You would hold no record of wrong when they broke their promise to you, in the same way your Father holds no record of your wrong when you, like the prodigal, turn from Him so many times each day.

You would not be annoyed by them. You would not secretly wish they looked differently, or were more appreciative, or were more honoring of you or made more money. You would simply love them, seeing beyond your need for them to be or not be any certain way.

My friends, do we not all long to be loved that way? We ARE so loved by God, because He does not depend on our responses for His own sense of wholeness and fulfillment.

How will we demonstrate our captivation in loving that way today?

 

094 – Sometimes the High Road is under construction [Podcast]

Choose it anyway

 

Welcome to Season 3 of the Your Church Matters podcast. In this episode (94) I talked about the concept of Taking the High Road.  I told a story of a recent situation where I had to choose the high road and then used the metaphor of a road under construction, and signs you might see on such a road, to encourage living on the high road.

 

 

Three signs you may see on a road under construction:

1. CAUTION.

Slow down; the high road can’t be rushed.  There are hazards to you and others.  Distracted driving can put you in the ditch.

2. UNDER CONSTRUCTION.

Something in you may need to be deconstructed, renovated, or created.

Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. (Romans 12:2)

3. LOCAL TRAFFIC ONLY.

Take up residence on the high road; don’t try to pass through quickly.

 

Two benefits of the High Road:

1. The view is magnificent.

2. Junk always runs downhill.

Like a fluttering sparrow or a darting swallow, an undeserved curse does not come to rest. (Proverbs 26:2)

How you can help me help others:

  • Subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and give us a rating and review. 
  • We are also on Stitcher.com and Google Play, so if you prefer one of those formats, please subscribe there.
  • Share the love by clicking on one or more of the social share buttons at either the top or bottom of this post.

To comment on this episode or leave a question for a future episode:

1. Comment section below

2. Email: contactgerrylewis@gmail.com

3. Voicemail: 817-929-0643

4. Direct tweet @drgerrylewis

*Special thanks to Keith Cooper (Guitar Music)

*Special thanks to Nathan Woodward (Saxophone Music)

Let’s get to the heart of the matter

There are matters into which we need to look deeply

So what is this mystical “heart of the matter” that people talk about?  Or for that matter, what’s the matter?

No, I didn’t just ask you what’s wrong.  I realize that we often use “what’s wrong” and “what’s the matter” interchangeably, but that’s a false assumption.  “What’s the matter” means that there is a matter at hand that needs to be identified so that it can be properly considered. Getting to the “heart of the matter” means that we look deeply into the core of the matter at hand.

Last week I began a discussion of core values.  In that post I shared the first two of my four recently identified core values.  If you missed that post, you can find it at here.

I’ll also remind you that I share these as (1) an explanation of why I communicate the way I do, (2) permission for you to call me out if I violate them, and (3) an example to challenge you to consider your own core values.

So, here are the last two:

Core Value #3 – Lead from your strengths. I am a person of influence, therefore I am a leader. I will influence and lead poorly if I try to be all things to all people or spend all my time trying to get better where I’m weak.  My primary question is not, “What do leaders and influencers do?  My primary question is, “What must I do as a leader and influencer?” I must demonstrate this value by knowing my strengths and aligning my life around them.

Core Value #4 – Truth has one source.  As one who has spent the majority of my adult life working within a church context, it is an occupational hazard to divide life into sacred and secular.  Ministry vocation versus secular job.  Christian versus secular music.  Bible versus every other book in the world.  If Jesus truly is the Truth (as John 14:6 says) and the Bible is the written revelation of God’s truth (as numerous passages proclaim) then God is the Source of everything that is really true.  If a statement contradicts what is found in the Bible, then it is not true.  But if a statement is consistent with what is found in the Bible, even if it is spoken by someone who doesn’t accept the Bible as true, it is still true.  What makes it true is the statement itself, not the speaker.  Truth spoken by my sworn enemy is still truth.  A lie spoken by my best friend is still a lie. That’s why I can appreciate, quote, and learn something from someone with whom I disagree on many points. I must demonstrate this value by eliminating the concept of “secular” from my life. 

Work, words, music, art, actions—we dare call nothing “secular” that finds its source in the Author of life, truth, and beauty.  My belief is that “secular” does not exist. There is only “sacred” and “sinful.”

We dare call nothing “secular” that finds its source in the Author of life, truth, and beauty. Click To Tweet

I have developed a 3 part test to help me determine if something I intend to do or say is sacred or sinful:

 (1) The Content Test – Can this be done for the glory of God?  (2) The Intent Test – Am I seeking to display the character of God? (3) The Context Test – As I seek to display His character and live for His glory, is this the right time and place?

So, where’s your heart?  Are you connected at the core to the Author and Source of all Truth?  Do your values give evidence of what you say you believe?  I’d love to hear from you.  Don’t ever forget that your life matters to God.

To share your thoughts on core values, truth, or the sacred/secular distinction:

  • Comment below to share them with me publicly.
  • To share them with me privately, Email contactgerrylewis.com

To download a printable PDF of this infographic, click on the link below.

Discerning the Sacred 2

What are your core values?

And how do you demonstrate them in your life?

“We don’t do what we believe in; we do what we value.” 

That statement has stuck with me for over twenty years.  It was spoken by our adjunct professor in my first doctoral seminar in 1994.  Here was his point: Often, when we say we believe in something, what we mean is that we agree with it in principle

We don’t do what we believe in; we do what we value. Click To Tweet

We believe in honesty until a “little white lie” gets us out of a jam.  We believe in living within our means until we see something shiny that’s on sale for a limited time only.  We believe in God but can’t really bring ourselves to surrender our lives to Him.  I could go on and on, but I don’t think it’s necessary.

What we truly value, on the other hand, is not demonstrated in our statements, but by our actions.  If I say I value something, but don’t truly invest myself in doing it, I don’t really value it; I simply believe in it.

I don’t know when the term “core values” first came into vogue, but it has been popular for some time for businesses, organizations (including churches), and even individuals to identify their core values.

According to businessdictionary.com:  A core value is “A principle that guides an organization’s internal conduct as well as its relationship with the external world. Core values are usually summarized in the mission statement or in a statement of core values.”

Not long ago, I spent two days in a LifePlanning process.  As a part of that, I identified four core values by which I intend to operate in the world.  I am sharing two of them with you this week and two of them next week.

I share them as (1) an explanation of why I communicate the way I do, (2) permission for you to call me out if I violate them, and (3) an example to challenge you to consider your own core values.

Core Value #1“Gospel” means “good news.”  Part of my calling is to proclaim (sometimes speak, sometimes write, sometimes demonstrate) the gospel of Jesus Christ.  It is incredibly important for me to remember that the word “gospel” literally means “good message or news.”  That why I’m not big on whining, criticism, or getting sucked into politics.  I must demonstrate this core value by not being a jerk and by living joyfully.

Core Value #2Focus on the road ahead.  I believe there is always something new and amazing over the next hill and around the next corner.  To make that belief a value, I must demonstrate this value by being completely present wherever I am and constantly learning something that will prepare me for the next step.

Your core values will be different from mine.  You may even disagree with mine.  You may even want to argue with mine.  (It would be pointless, but you could do it).  I’m actually not very concerned about what you think of mine.  I would, however, love to hear about yours.

Why?  Because our lives and our values matter to God and we are on this amazing journey of life together.  

To share your thoughts on core values:

  • Comment below to share them with me publicly.
  • To share them with me privately, Email contactgerrylewis.com